FAQs

Is your honey raw?

There is no legal definition in the US for raw honey, but most recognize raw honey to be honey as it exists in the beehive. We think honey in its natural state is a wonderful, healthful food. Brine’s Fine Honeys are gently warmed to hive temperature to help honey flow better for bottling and are only coarsely filtered to remove any objectionable material, such as bee parts or large wax flakes. So you may see a few small pollen grains in our honey, and our honey may crystallize faster than highly processed honeys. That is a sign of our honeys’ authenticity and our commitment to minimal processing.

How should I store honey?
Honey should be stored in a tightly sealed, non-porous container at room temperature out of direct sunlight. You should not store your honey in the refrigerator, as it encourages faster crystallization.
My honey has become solid or crystallized. Is that bad?
Your honey has just crystallized. Honey is a super saturated solution of sugars so, over time, most honeys will crystallize. Actually, crystallization is a good sign that your honey has not been super-filtered or highly heated. Either enjoy your honey in its crystallized state (many people prefer crystallized honey, as it can be easier to scoop and spread) or decrystallize it as per the instructions in the next question.
How do I re-liquify honey?
Heat up some water in a pan, remove it from the heat source, and stand your open (glass, not plastic) jar of honey in the hot water. Periodically stir the honey as it warms. You can repeat the process several times, if necessary, to fully decrystallize the honey.
Can honey be fed to infants under one year of age?

Honey should never be fed to infants under one year of age. Honey (as well as some other foods) may contain spores which are unsafe for infants under one year of age to consume because they lack a fully developed digestive system. Honey is not only safe, but a healthy food choice for older children and adults, including pregnant and lactating women.