Turkish Simit is a bread ring that resembles a bagel but is baked without the addition of boiling. Simit rings are traditionally dipped in grape molasses and covered in sesame seeds or poppy seeds. This Turkish Simit is dipped in Brine’s Fine Honeys’ Buckwheat Honey, which provides a rich, malty sweetness that will keep the robust flavor profile of Simit in one’s thoughts all day long.

Turkish Simit

Turkish Simit is a bread ring that resembles bagel but is baked without the addition of boiling. Simit rings are traditionally dipped in grape molasses and covered in sesame seeds or poppy seeds. This Turkish Simit is dipped in Brine’s Fine Honeys’ Buckwheat Honey, which provides a rich, malty sweetness that will keep the robust flavor profile of Simit in one’s thoughts all day long.
Note: Simit rings can be frozen in a freezer bag for 1-2 months and taken out and warmed up for a Turkish breakfast or any delicious meal.
Prep Time 20 mins
1 hr 20 mins
Total Time 2 hrs
Cuisine Turkish
Servings 6

Ingredients
  

  • 1 teaspoon granulated sugar
  • ½ cup lukewarm water (approximately. 110-115° F)
  • 3 teaspoon dried yeast
  • 4 - 4¼ cups all-purpose flour (plus additional for rolling out)
  • teaspoon salt
  • Canola or vegetable oil
  • ½ cup Brine’s Buckwheat Honey
  • ½ cup water
  • 1 cup sesame seeds
  • 1 cup poppy seeds

Instructions
 

  • Add the lukewarm water to a mixing bowl, followed by the sugar and the yeast. Give the mixture a quick mix and let sit for 5-10 minutes until the mixture is foamy.
  • Combine 4 cups of the flour and the salt in separate bowl and whisk together. Set aside the remaining ¼ cup of flour.
  • Once the yeast has foamed, add in the flour mixture. Either by hand or by using a dough hook on lower speed, knead the dough for 7-8 minutes, until the dough comes together and becomes smooth. If the dough looks too wet after 6 minutes, add in the remaining flour, but you may not need to.
  • Place the dough into a new bowl that has been coated with canola or vegetable oil. Turn the dough to coat with the oil. Cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place for an hour.
  • Preheat the oven to 425° F.
  • On a floured surface, turn out the risen dough and cut into 6 pieces.
  • Roll out each piece to roughly 12-15 inches long. Fold in half, twisting the two pieces around each other and then join the two pieces to form a circle. Tuck the two ends in together to join.
  • Once the simit rings are complete, mix the Brine’s Buckwheat Honey with the water until the honey dissolves. Dip each ring into the mixture and coat completely.
  • Once each simit is dipped, toss in a bowl of your preferred topping (sesame seeds, poppy seeds, or a combination of the two).
  • Place the simit rings on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Cover with a towel and let rise for 20 minutes.
  • Bake the simit rings for 15-20 minutes. They should sound hollow when tapped and bake to a golden brown color. Allow to cool completely on a wire rack.

Notes

Simit: Almost A Bagel

Turkish simit is so much more than an offshoot of its younger bagel cousin. Simit rings originate from the Ottoman Empire’s Anatolian period, dating back to the 1400’s. Simit rings were enjoyed by sultans and soldiers alike (source) and remain a favorite to this day.
In modern Istanbul, Simit rings are one of the most popular street foods and are still typically enjoyed with a Turkish breakfast including eggs, feta cheese, fruit jam, and Turkish tea.

Brine’s Buckwheat Honey

Could there be a better description to the flavor notes of Brine’s Buckwheat Honey than “old wood?” The very words conjure up images of ancient Ottoman structures filled with the beautiful aroma of spices, nuts, and grilled meats. The malty, molasses color, texture, and flavor of the buckwheat honey lends itself so well to being an ideal substitute for pekmez, a grape molasses traditionally used in Simit recipes.
Brine’s Buckwheat Honey is mixed with a little water so that the Simit rings can be dipped in the mixture before sesame and/or poppy seeds are added. The result is a golden texture and a malty, sweet flavor, which turns this classic Turkish street food staple into a delectable part of breakfast, regardless of where you are in the world.